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used with permission from Tektonika (HP)

Information security breaches are becoming so commonplace, they’re seen as the cost of doing business—but they don’t have to be. Promoting internet safety and device security isn’t as hard as it might seem. By making small changes to online behavior, IT professionals and users can do a lot to keep their business safe. And the first way you can start is:

Stop using passwords

Wait, what? You read that right: The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) recently came out with new guidance on password best practices. According to Mike Garcia, former director of NIST’s Trusted Identities Group, the gist of these guidelines is, “Simply put: Use passphrases, not passwords.”

This is great news for any users who spend a lot of time in “Forgot Your Password?” purgatory. For years, the advice for keeping passwords hacker-proof was to make them more complicated. But that made them user-proof, too.  Read more...


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used with permission from HP Technology at Work

Is your company’s email providing a tempting route for cyber criminals to attack your business? Hackers continue to target businesses with phishing attacks. Once opened, these malicious email messages can hijack an entire company’s financial information and gain access to funds and personal information. Email is a business essential, but also an easy avenue for hackers to use and abuse. How can you keep your business secure?

The human factor

Businesses of all sizes face vulnerabilities via email. When email accounts are hacked and compromised, cyber criminals can gain access to information including user names, telephone numbers, birthdates, passwords, and unencrypted security questions.

Email is a common entry point for hackers because it’s an easy way to exploit the weak link in cybersecurity policies: humans. Employees rushing through their emails can easily click on a malicious link. No wonder that a recent survey reveals some 90% of cyber attacks initiate with email.  Read more...


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clutter-tipClutter is a mailbox management feature of Office 365 for Business. (If you don’t have an Office 365 for Business subscription, you will not have this feature.) It analyzes how you process your email and then moves “unimportant” or low-priority email from your Inbox into a special folder, to save you the time of doing this yourself. Essentially, it sorts emails it thinks you will already ignore into a secondary Inbox. If you already have an email spam protection tool running, Clutter may be overkill. If you’re tired of fishing emails out of the special folder or forgetting to check it entirely, you can turn it off. Here’s how!

Clutter in Outlook 2016

If you’re using Outlook 2016, you can quickly jump to the relevant Office 365 settings from your desktop version by following these instructions.

  1. In desktop Outlook, right-click on the Clutter folder and choose “Manage Clutter”.clutter01
  2. A browser window will now open, prompting you to login into Office 365 if you aren’t already.
  Read more...

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used with permission from Norton by Symantec, by Nadia Kovacs

Protezione da spam e virusSpam is a problem on the Internet, coming at us from just about every angle of the online space. Some spammers develop sophisticated, well-planned strategies, while others can be sloppy and still drive results. Either way, spam tactics come in a variety of shades, and it’s up to users to identify signals early on and avoid unsolicited content.

Here’s a look at some spam tactics used in popular Internet spaces. Become familiar with these tactics to help identify them and avoid them whenever possible.

Spam on Social Media

A lot of the time, spam on social media is just bad social media marketing, or content marketing gone array. Being on either end (sending or receiving) of social media spam is not a good place to be. For receiving parties, it can be frustrating and even dangerous, depending on what the intention of the spammer is; and for senders, it’s extremely unprofessional and not a good way of building rapport with an audience.  Read more...


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used with permission from Norton by Symantec
by Nadia Kovacs

Spear phishing isn’t what you do when you’re on vacation in Hawaii. It’s a targeted attack on your personal information. An updated version of the old trick “phishing,” where scam artists simply ask you for your password or other private information, spear phishing takes this trick to the next level, using social engineering. Before you respond to that email asking for you to verify your address or other personal information, read this article to protect yourself against spear phishing.

What Is Spear Phishing?

Spear phishing effectively uses all the data that’s on the Internet about you to lull you into an inappropriate sense of comfort before attempting to get your personal information. Because this technique is so successful, it accounts for approximately 91 percent of all phishing in the United States today.

Think about it: How much about you is on the Internet?  Read more...


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searchemail_thumb

Do you have thousands of emails stored in your Outlook account? Do you sometimes need to find the one email from five months ago that mentions the access key for a software program you didn’t think anyone was still using?

We all have times when we need to dig through the haystack of email to find the needle. This can be very challenging even if you carefully manage emails with folders and categories.

Here are some tips for searching your Outlook email!

How search works

The search bar sits in the upper right of the mailbox or folder you are looking at. For example, if you are simply looking at your inbox, it appears like this:

searchemail_01[1]

You’ll see it says “Search Current Mailbox (Ctrl + E)” and on the right side it says “Current Mailbox” with a dropdown box that also lets you select other options.

If you move into a folder, it will reflect this as well.  Read more...


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email_decisions

used with permission from HP Technology at Work

When it comes to business email, change is in the air.

Web-based platforms have all but taken over the personal email market—Gmail alone has over 425 million active users worldwide and counting [1]. With Microsoft® also ending extended product support for Exchange Server 2003, now could easily seem like the perfect time to switch your office desktop email client and server to an online solution.

But most small businesses should think twice.

Solutions that are perfect for home use are often underpowered when it comes to getting office tasks done, and email is no exception. Here are the top ways desktop email clients and servers are still beating their browser-based challengers, and why they should still be your top choice for business email.

Desktop client advantages

  • Offline management: Whether you’re on the road, flying to a presentation, or just in a Wi-Fi dead zone, having local access to your messages and attachments means you can stay productive without having to worry about internet access.
  Read more...

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email-spamAfter some recent discussions with some clients and family, it occurred to me that many people still have questions about how to tell “fake” emails from real ones – so I thought it might be a good time to point out some sure-fire ways to know when to hit that delete button:

  1. Listen to your gut.  If it comes from a company or person you don’t know or do business with, delete it.
  2. One of my favorites is URL link inspection.  If you hold your mouse over a link without clicking it (press-and-hold on an iPad), you will see the URL that appears (sometimes at the bottom of your mail program) of where that clicking that link will go.  You have to look at the beginning part of the domain name.  Ninety-five percent of the time, this will not be someplace you want to go.
  3. If you are looking at the URLs via the inspection technique above, be aware that some “fake” URLs can be spelled similarly to “real” ones, so be on the lookout for misleading ones.
  Read more...

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Phishing scams are at the top of cyber criminals’ moneymaking lists. It’s disturbing that the important data of organizations such as Sony are under threat from phishing scams. But in contrast to the widespread notion, these scams affect small enterprise owners as much as they affect the big corporations.

The Internet Crime Complaint Center (partners with the FBI) and the National White Collar Crime Center (NW3C) have reported more than 300,000 cases of online phishing scams and other Internet related crimes.

To give you a better comprehension as to why your small business is of great value to a cyber criminal, let’s take a look at what phishing is exactly. 

What is phishing?

What does “phishing” mean? Phishing is the attempt to access private data, such as financial information, usernames, and passwords. This is attained by making false websites, graphics, email accounts, and phone numbers. The subject is convinced, by one method or another, to reveal these types of data that may be used to steal their identity (social security numbers are a popular target).  Read more...

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